Friday, September 18, 2020

Drop a Warhead in baking soda water, and bubbles erupt. Leave a Skittle in water, and the S floats to the surface. Melt a Starburst, and shiny oil spots form. You're doing candy experiments--science experiments with candy.

Melt Halloween candy. Dissolve Valentine hearts. Float Easter Peeps. Or let your kids create their own candy science experiments.

Candy experiments. All candy. All science. All fun.



As seen in Family Fun, Parents, Mothering Magazine, Highlights, the Chicago Tribune, ParentMap, Miami Family, and The Red Tricycle


Friday, April 18, 2014

Easter experiments in article

Candy experiments--and a crazy Cadbury video--featured in this article.

A Little Easter Bunny Carnage

I have been taking pictures of candy all day long--candy in oil, candy in water, candy out of water... Did you know it's REALLY hard to photograph glass?

Here's one that may or may not make the book.

Video showing how Cadbury eggs are made. Watch around minute 4 to see how two filled halves are stuck together to make one filled egg! (You can skip the first part of the video--there's a lot of hair nets and handwashing which, while I'll glad to learn they do, are not as interesting as the candy part.)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

How Much Chocolate in a Chocolate Easter Bunny?

In the box, this chocolate Easter bunny looks like way more than a kid needs to eat. But, because it's hollow, this 1.75 oz bunny only contains as much chocolate as this set of snack-sized bars.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Pop Rocks and TemptationCandy.com

I've been exploring lots of fun things to do with Pop Rocks for the new Candy Experiments book, like watching the tiniest pieces bubble and float. Thanks to www.temptationcandy.com for their generous donation of Pop Rocks to the candy experiments cause!

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Enormous Gummy Worm Science Fair Project

This was my very favorite science fair project at our school this year--a 26-inch gummy worm put into water to see what would happen. Apparently it more than doubled in weight, starting at 2 1/2 pounds, and absorbing 3 1/2 pounds of water!

 


This is a second giant gummy worm, showing the size of the original (note that the sample below has had several tail segments chopped off for eager tasters.)



They said it didn't actually grow much in length, but they'd only had it in a bucket of water for the afternoon. Wonder what it would have looked like after two days in a bathtub?